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Common Oil Leak Spots in a BMW

Common Oil Leak Spots in a BMW

When you drive a BMW, you expect excellence above and beyond that of the average vehicle on the road. The brand is built on smooth performance, sleek style, and above all, mechanical perfection. When a BMW owner drives off the lot for the first time, they can expect nothing but excellence from their new vehicle.

That just makes it all the more jarring and frustrating when one of your engine’s parts calls it quits, be it a problem as big as a blown catalytic converter or as small as an oil leak. While it’s normal for your BMW to have some small fluid drips in and around the engine (such as condensation from the A/C system), what’s not normal is when you notice puddles of fluid beneath your BMW every morning. That begs the question: where is the oil coming from?

The Importance of Oil in Your Engine

Oil in your engine is responsible for cooling and lubricating all of the heated moving parts. Your oil makes sure that your engine does not overheat or wear out too quickly through normal use. Without it, you run the risk of severe and extensive engine damage that may result in your engine overheating.

Furthermore, without oil, the more heat-sensitive parts of your engine may break or crack after repeated exposure to hotter-than-normal temperatures.

Here are the most common locations of oil leaks in your BMW:

Oil pan gasket leaks

Perhaps the most common leak of all comes from the oil pan gasket. The oil pan in your BMW is where your oil sits when the vehicle is not in use, and therefore can accumulate sludge and mineral deposits over time from old or hot oil, which can wear at your oil pan gasket over time.

Valve cover gasket leaks

This is one of the most common locations to experience a leak in BMW. The valve cover gasket protects the rocker arms and valves at the top of the engine. Typically, valve cover gasket leaks are more common after 60,000 miles, although a defective gasket can leak much sooner.

Rear main seal leaks

The rear main seal tends to fail when the crankshaft of your BMW encounters too much wear. When that happens, the main seal may be unable to hold tight or it may be otherwise damaged and may begin to leak.

Timing cover gasket leaks

The timing cover gasket is the seal that protects the connection between the engine block and the timing cover. If the timing cover gasket is the issue, you may also notice that coolant is leaking as well.

Oil filter housing gasket leaks

If you notice that oil is leaking only on the left side of the engine or if it looks like it’s coming from the oil pan but not the oil pan gasket, the leak may actually be coming from the oil filter housing gasket.

Common Causes of Oil Leaks in Your BMW

The cause of your oil leak is dependent upon where the leak is coming from. However, some causes are more common than others:

  • Old age and high mileage are one of the most common causes of oil leaks in any vehicle, as the wear and tear over time causes some parts to fail.
  • Inconsistent oil changes and improper oil type can cause oil deposits to build up in your oil pan or other parts of your engine.
  • Rough driving habits can overexert your engine, which leads to the components of your engine potentially being damaged.
  • A loose filler cap usually occurs when the cap is improperly replaced after an oil change. This can cause oil to leak from your pan.

Turning Wrenches will Address Your Oil Leak in Louisville, KY

If you suspect you have an oil leak in BMW Oil Changeyour BMW, bring your baby to Turning Wrenches of Louisville, KY today. Our knowledgeable, friendly technicians have been working under the hood for decades with only the best diagnostic and repair tools available. Moreover, our dedication to fixing and restoring German-made cars to their best selves is unmatched in the Louisville area. We offer a 36-month/36,000-mile warranty on all parts and repairs, so you know that you’re protected until the time comes for your BMW’s next servicing. Call us today.

How to Deal with Timing Belt Issues in an Audi in Louisville

How to Deal with Timing Belt Issues in an Audi in Louisville

As you drive your Audi, necessary servicing and maintenance should be performed. The longer you have your vehicle, the more often you may have to bring it into a trusted mechanic. One such part that may require extra maintenance is the timing belt. If the timing belt is continuously functioning in a problematic fashion, then other internal engine parts will be damaged. The best way to avoid this is by knowing the purpose of your timing belt and what signs to look for that indicate there is an issue with it.

The Purpose of the Timing Belt in your Audi

If you have an Audi that is older than 2005, you will have a timing belt in your engine. After 2005, Audi vehicles were designed with timing chains instead of timing belts. Regardless of if your Audi has a timing belt or chain, the purpose and function are still the same. The timing belt is made out of rubber and is located inside the engine. It serves to maintain the synchronization of the camshaft and the crankshaft.

The camshaft is responsible for ensuring the proper function of the valves so air and gas can be let in and out of the engine. The purpose of the crankshaft is to move the pistons up and down. Both parts have to always move in a synchronized fashion, and this is the job of the timing belt. All of these parts working together will ensure that your Audi remains running as your drive.

It is suggested that the timing belt is changed every 75,000 or every five years. Although the timing chain is meant to last the lifetime of your Audi, some Audis may experience occurrences when it does. Knowing the signs that point to necessary repair is important.

Signs of Timing Belt Issues

The first sign that there is an issue with the timing belt in your Audi is a ticking sound coming from the engine. When the timing belt begins to wear out, it will not be as tight as it was previously. The timing belt will then no longer fit onto its pulleys as intended. The older the timing belt is, the looser it becomes. The ticking noise comes from the timing belt hitting parts in the engine that it normally has no contact with. So a repeated ticking will be heard as your drive.

Another sign of timing belt issues is that the engine will not turn over. As previously stated, the timing belt is required to correctly function the necessary parts that allow the engine to turn on and run. Without the timing belt working properly, the parts it is connected to will not either. Thus, the engine will not turn over when you turn the key.

The third sign is oil leaking from the front of the engine. The timing belt needs lubrication in order to function correctly. The way this occurs is oil in the timing belt cover. If there is a leak that can be seen in the front of the engine, then the timing belt cover is not secured properly. When this happens, there is an issue with the timing belt. Lubricant is needed to ensure that the timing belt is able to properly and continuously synchronize the camshaft and crankshaft.

Dealing with the Timing Belt Issue in your Audi

Keeping an eye on the overall function of your Audi Timing Belt Issues Fix Audi is one of your main responsibilities as a car owner. So if you notice any of the above signs of timing belt issues, it is time to bring your Audi in for serving.

The best place to go for repairs is Turning Wrenches in Louisville, KY because all of our technicians are trained and certified in Audi vehicles. We care about your car and want you to continue to drive safely after the repair, which is why we offer a 36-month/36,000-mile warranty on all our services. In addition to this, we use the latest tools and diagnostic equipment to address the timing belt issue and any problems in your Audi.

We always ensure that you are safely back on the road after a timing belt repair or any maintenance. Contact us today for an appointment.

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